INS Image Bank


Images Available for Members' Use
INS members may use the following images in slide sets or other presentations that appropriately represent the content shown and have a non-commercial, explanatory purpose.
The images are either in the public domain, taken by INS, licensed through a Creative Commons License for non-commercial use, or provided to INS by their originator for educational use.
The specified credit lines should accompany each image that is used.
INS members may submit original images for members' use with a signed photo release form.

Brain Images

brain imageBrain Image

Credit:
Image courtesy the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health

Access: Public domain


CT Closed-LoopClosed-Loop Responsive Stimulation CT Imaging

Credit: Image courtesy International Neuromodulation Society Member Chengyuan Wu, MD, MSBmE, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 2012

Access: Permission granted by originator


X-ray Closed-LoopClosed-Loop Responsive Stimulation X-ray Imaging

Credit: Image courtesy International Neuromodulation Society Member Chengyuan Wu, MD, MSBmE, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 2012

Access: Permission granted by originator


CT Scanner

Credit: Image courtesy National Institutes of Health

Access: Public domain


Deep Brain Stimulation

(Note: This image shows Parkinson's disease deep brain stimulation surgery in particular)

Credit: 2005 Image by Wikimedia user Thomasbg CC BY-SA 3.0

Access: You may adapt, copy, distribute, and transmit the work under the following conditions:
    •    Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). 




    •    Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar permissions as this one

Reuse or distribution must clearly reference the terms (CC BY-SA 3.0), detailed at the link to the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike deed, which may be embedded for clarity.


MRI Scanner

Credit: Image courtesy National Institutes of Health

Access: Public domain


Parts of Brain Involved in Dependence on Nicotine, Alcohol, and Psychiatric Disorders

Credit: Image courtesy the National Institute of Mental Health/National Institutes of Health

Access: Public domain



PET Scanner

Credit: Image courtesy the National Institute of Mental Health/National Institutes of Health

Access: Public domain



Stereotactic Surgery Frame


Access: INS photo, 2012; permission granted for educational use


Structures of Brain including Mood Regulation Circuitry

Credit: Image courtesy the National Institute of Mental Health/National Institutes of Health

Access: Public domain


Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

Credit: 2008 Image by MistyHora, English language Wikipedia CC BY-SA 3.0

Access: You may adapt, copy, distribute, and transmit the work under the following conditions:
    •    Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). 




    •    Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar permissions as this one

Reuse or distribution must clearly reference the terms (CC BY-SA 3.0), detailed at the link to the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike deed, which may be embedded for clarity.


Spine Images

Cross-Section of the Spine

Credit:
Image courtesy National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases/National Institutes of Health

Access: Public domain


Spinal Cord Stimulation Demonstration Lead

Access: INS image shows office staff, 2012; permission granted


Spinal Cord Stimulation Demonstration Pulse Generator, Lead

Access: INS image shows office staff, 2012; permission granted


Spinal Cord Stimulation Demonstration Patient Controller

Access: INS image shows office staff, 2012; permission granted


SCS implantation preparation, ambulatory surgery centerPercutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation Preparation, Ambulatory Surgery Center

Caption: Positioning of the patient is often a compromise between the patient’s comfort and the implanter’s need to have the lumbar lordosis diminished. Cushions or even better an adjustable surgical table help.

Access: Picture courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, MD PhD, Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, 2014.

Note: Written permission for publication has been obtained from the patient; public domain use is granted for any non-commercial purpose as long as credit is provided.

Additional information: Although the image is watermarked with the logo of Aarhus University Hospital, the hospital does not own copyright of the image that was taken by Dariusz Orlowski, PhD during a procedure performed by Dr. Kaare Meier and Prof. Jens Christian Sørensen at the Center for Ambulatory Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, to treat  bilateral lower extremity pain caused by failed back surgery syndrome. The picture series is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.


Percutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation Preparation, Ambulatory Surgery Center

Caption: A quick fluoroscopic survey will identify the vertebral levels as well as visualize gross pathology of the spine.

Access: Picture courtesy of Dr. Kaare Meier, MD PhD, Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, 2014.

Note: Written permission for publication has been obtained from the patient; public domain use is granted for any non-commercial purpose as long as credit is provided.

Additional information: Although the image is watermarked with the logo of Aarhus University Hospital, the hospital does not own copyright of the image that was taken by Dariusz Orlowski, PhD during a procedure performed by Dr. Kaare Meier and Prof. Jens Christian Sørensen at the Center for Ambulatory Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, to treat  bilateral lower extremity pain caused by failed back surgery syndrome. The picture series is not intended to serve as endorsement of particular products or manufacturers and is published for educational purposes only.

Last Updated on Sunday, January 01, 2017 08:32 PM